Timeline – 1962 Part 4

Share

Hi and Lois Sunday page color proof, December 30, 1962.

Mort Walker made some conscious decisions when establishing the themes of Hi and Lois. “Most strips of the time depicted the parents bickering and the kids being mean,” Mort remembered in a 1986 interview. “I thought we would show the positive side of a family. The kids are cute. The parents love each other. It’s a nuclear family against the world rather than against each other. They’re against crabgrass and traffic and taxes. We took the meanness out of it.” The Flagstons are a “Good Housekeeping Seal of Appoval” family.
(more…)

Timeline – 1962 Part 3

Share

Hi and Lois Sunday page color proof, August 12, 1962.

Dik Browne was a veteran advertising artist when he started working on Hi and Lois in 1954, so he probably had prior experience drawing animals. It still must have been challenging for him to render an elephant, a lion, a giraffe, monkeys and seals so that they blended in with the established style of the strip. These look more like humorous caricatures than realistic wildlife illustrations.
(more…)

Timeline – 1962 Part 2

Share

Hi and Lois Sunday page color proof, June 17, 1962.

Mort Walker and Dik Browne were having some fun with sound effects in this episode. “SKROOiiCK!” is certainly a noise that can grab your attention and get on your nerves.

There’s a word for this technique that Mort Walker explains in his classic book, The Lexicon of Comicana. “Cartoonists are especially fond of onomatopoeia (words that imitate natural sounds). Comic strips are literally strewn with PLOPS, BLAMS, ZOTS, OOFS, SWOOSHES and ZOOMS. What’s more, a cartoonist takes great pride in interpreting new sounds all the time. Listening outside his studio you can hear him vocalizing the piece of action at hand…a bat hitting a ball, FWAT!…a foot kicking a garbage pail, K-CHUNKKK! He will try many sounds before he settles on the one that satisfies him. Then he will add more meaning to the sound by animating the lettering.”
(more…)